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Title: Blog by Novelist William S. Frankl, MD

Archive for the ‘Theater’ Category

April Birthdays

Wednesday, April 26th, 2017

T.S. Eliot begins his epic poem, The Waste Land, with these immortal lines:

April is the cruelest month, breeding
Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
Memory and desire, stirring
Dull roots with spring rain.

Perhaps Eliot did, or perhaps he did not, know that two great men were born in April, and thus April is not such a cruel month after all.
Today is traditionally held to be the birthday of William Shakespeare , who was baptized on April 26, 1564, in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England. He left behind no personal papers; so much of what we know, or think we know, about him comes to us from public and court documents, with a fair measure of inference and speculation. We do know that his father John was a glove maker and alderman, and his mother, Mary Arden, was a landed heiress. William’s extensive knowledge of Latin and Greek likely came from his education at the well-respected local grammar school. That was the extent of his formal education, which has led to hundreds of years of conspiracy theories disputing the authorship of his plays, since many found it unbelievable that he could have written so knowledgeably about history, politics, royalty, and foreign lands on a grammar school education. Various figures, such as Francis Bacon, Christopher Marlowe, the 17th Earl of Oxford, and even Queen Elizabeth I, have been put forward as possible – though unproven – ghost writers.

We know that he married the older – and pregnant – Anne Hathaway when he was 18 and she was 26, and she gave birth to a daughter, Susanna, six months later. Twins Hamnet and Judith followed two years after that, and son Hamnet died at age 11. It’s speculated that his son’s death hit Shakespeare hard, because he began to write Hamlet soon afterward.

He moved to London around 1588 – possibly to escape deer-poaching charges in Stratford – and began a career as an actor and a playwright. By 1594, he was also managing partner of the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, a popular London theater troupe. He was popular in his lifetime, but his popularity didn’t rise to the level that George Bernard Shaw referred to as “bardolatry” until the 19th century.

In 1611, he retired to Stratford and made out his will, leaving to his wife, Anne, his “second-best bed.” He died on or around his birthday in 1616, and was buried in the Church of the Holy Trinity in Stratford, leaving a last verse behind as his epitaph: “Good friend, for Jesus’ sake forbeare / to dig the dust enclosed here. / Blessed be the man who spares these stones, / and cursed be he who moves my bones.”

Though biographical details may be sketchy, his literary legacy is certain. He wrote 38 plays, 154 sonnets, and a couple of epic narrative poems. He created some of the most unforgettable characters ever written for the stage, and shifted effortlessly between formal court language and coarse vernacular. The Oxford English Dictionary credits him with coining 3,000 new words, and has contributed more phrases and sayings to the English language than any other individual. His idioms have woven themselves so snugly into our daily conversations that we aren’t even aware of them most of the time, phrases such as “a fool’s paradise,” “a sorry sight,” “dead as a doornail,” “Greek to me,” “come what may,” “eaten out of house and home,” “forever and a day,” “heart’s content,” “slept a wink,” “love is blind,” “night owl,” “wild goose chase,” and “into thin air.”

Though we have no way of knowing whether the Bard of Avon was writing of his own impending retirement when he wrote Prospero’s soliloquy from The Tempest in about 1610, it’s satisfying to think so:

Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Ye all which it inherit, shall dissolve,
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

 

It’s also the birthday of Enlightenment philosopher, Immanuel Kant , born in Königsberg, Prussia on April 22,1724. His father was a saddle maker. He studied theology, physics, mathematics, and philosophy at university, and worked for a time as a private tutor; he made very little money, but it gave him plenty of time for his own work. He lectured at the University of Königsberg for 15 years until he was eventually given a tenured position as professor of logic and metaphysics in 1770. Though he enjoyed hearing travel stories, he never ventured more than 50 miles from his hometown, believing that travel was not necessary to solve the problems of philosophy.

In his most influential work, The Critique of Pure Reason (1781), he argued against Empiricism, which held that the mind was a blank slate to be filled with observations of the physical world, and Rationalism, which held that it was possible to experience the world objectively without the interference of the mind; instead, he synthesized the two schools of thought, added that the conscious mind must process and organize our perceptions, and made a distinction between the natural world as we observe it and the natural world as it really is. He viewed morality as something that arises from human reason, and maintained that an action’s morality is determined not by the outcome of the action, but by the motive behind it. He is also famous for his single moral obligation, the “Categorical Imperative” namely, that we should judge our actions by whether or not we would want everyone else to act the same way.

He wrote, “Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe […] the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.”

Thursday, December 27th, 2012

The End of 2012––– November and December Redux

November and December, 2012, have been dismal, dreary months. November can be claimed (by at least some of us) as “d” and “d” because of the reelection of Obama and a failure to win the Senate. December is “d” and “d” primarily because of the hideous tragedy in Newtown/Sandy Hook where, on December 14th, twenty elementary school children and six teachers were killed by a twenty-year-old lunatic who started his day of slaughter in murdering his mother by shooting her in the face! He used several automatic weapons in his awful rampage. This gruesome event has called forth the anti-gun lobby who wish to ban all guns (can’t do as long as the Constitution is in force ––– although might not be long if our government continues to grow and control our lives) and the NRA idiots who continue to forster guns, hiding behind the Second Amendment, despite that no one can explain the need for automatic weapons for hunting deer.
A new committee has been empowered by the president to investigate gun violence and come up with recommendations. Both sides will chatter, some inconsequential, ineffective bill will be passed, and the mayhem will continue. Why? Because our government is made up of ill-educated ideologues ––– liberal and conservative ––– who don’t give a hoot and a holler about the fate of our nation, but rather how to get reelected and continue to make lots of money so he/she can retire in luxury.
Thus, the other crucial elements in this grotesque episode at Sandy Hook are neglected ––– the need for thousands of new beds for the lunatics that inhabit our society; the gross coarsening of our culture with its objectionable films/plays/games glorifying mayhem with firearms, knives, poisons, blunt instruments; the loss of courtesy in our dealings with our fellow citizens; the absence of dignity in our clothing, our speech, our music; the burgeoning drug culture in our society; and the abysmal lack of knowledge about our history and our traditions.
Perhaps 2013 will be a better year. I doubt it. I think there is no turning back from the debasement of our culture, the heavy hand of our government, and the dangers of the world beyond our borders.
More to come. I’m going to try to fill  up this blog before 1/1/13.


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